“August” Insights

Insights into “August: Osage County”

Dan Beecher (Bill Fordham): “Empathy, understanding, growth”

It’s funny: I’ve been acting for decades. My first turn on stage was at the tender age of 8, and then theater became my college major. And yet I still am not entirely sure what the hell acting really is. On the surface of it, it seems to be little more than just pretending. Pretending to be someone else in front of a bunch of people who paid to watch the pretense. That strikes me as incredibly odd. There’s clearly a deeper layer to this acting thing, though. I see it when I watch the incredibly talented people in “August: Osage County.” I see it when the kind, lovely women who are...

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Anne Louise Brings (Jean Fordham): “Those you love the most can hurt you the most.”

“August” has reminded me that no matter how careful we are with each other, there is always the potential for hurt. Familial relationships are a delicate and constant balancing act that I have yet to master.

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Richard Scharine (Beverly Weston) : “What could I bring to the role and take away from the play?”

When I was cast in Tracy Lett’s “August: Osage County” in the role of Beverly Weston, my initial reaction was “Who needs to act?” —because the character was so similar to me.

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Teresa Sanderson (Violet Weston): “A kindred spirit”

Teresa Sanderson (Violet Weston): “A kindred spirit”

When I think about the Weston clan, it reminds me of an old piece of fabric worn thin and faded, the threads breaking, the weave separating. So thin, so thin now that you can see through it, only individual threads left. This is the image I have in my brain at the end of Act One.

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Michele Rideout (Ivy Weston): “The play feels awful familiar”

Michele Rideout (Ivy Weston): “The play feels awful familiar”

I first read “August: Osage County” two years ago, and I immediately wanted to do it. It feels very much like a classic, a slice of literary Americana. A part of me wants to say my own family is nowhere near as dysfunctional as this one. But the truth is, the play feels awful familiar, even if not on so grand a scale, and that draw is there.

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April Fossen (Barbara Fordham): “Sometimes, we lie”

April Fossen (Barbara Fordham): “Sometimes, we lie”

We don’t say things purposely to hurt or expose each other. We do what we can to support each other’s decisions, even if we don’t agree with them. We steer away from painful or loaded topics.

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