Utah Premiere of “August: Osage County”

“August: Osage County,” honored with the Pulitzer Prize for Drama and five Tony Awards (including Best Play), will be staged in a co-production by Utah Repertory Theater Company and Silver Summit Theatre from Aug. 15-31.

The Broadway production was reviewed as “fiercely funny and bitingly sad” by the New York Times.

The Utah premiere of “August: Osage County” will be directed by Mark Fossen.

The ensemble cast members are Teresa Sanderson as Violet Weston and April Fossen as Barbara Fordham, along with Daniel Beecher, Anne Louise Brings, Sallie Cooper, Joe Crnich, Stein Erickson, April Fossen, Tamara Howell, Melanie Nelson, Michele Rideout, Richard Scharine, Allen Smith and Daniel Torrence.

The production will inaugurate Salt Lake’s newest theater venue, Sugar Space Warehouse Theater / River District at 130 South 800 West, Salt Lake City.

Watch advance promo videos here:

Meet the Westons of Pawhuska, Osage County, Oklahoma

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJR2g9hemBU

A Preview of “August: Osage County”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsXmQPFImsE

Director Mark Fossen Introduces “August: Osage County”

Broadway World selected this production of “August: Osage County” as a Top Utah Summer Pick! It’s among the mostly highly anticipated play of the fall theater season.

For immediate information, contact Blair Howell, marketing director, at BlairHowell@msn.com or 801-592-9362.

Hailed by the New York Times as “hugely entertaining! A ripsnorter full of blistering, funny dialogue, acid-etched characterizations and scenes of no-holds-barred emotional combat. The fiercely funny and bitingly sad ‘August: Osage County’ is a turbo-charged tragicomedy that is a feast for actors and audiences alike.”
and
“The most exciting new American play Broadway has seen in years.”

“This is a play that will leave us laughing and wondering, shuddering and smiling, long after the house lights come back on.”—N.Y. Newsday

About “August: Osage County”:

A dark comedy that doubles audiences in laughter one moment and then gasps them in shock the next moment without warning and without apology. But throughout the chaos, “August: Osage County” is a play about family.

It is a play about a group of people who, despite fierce vices and deep-rooted differences, are tightly bound by blood, vows, and a long, damaged history.

Together for the first time in years, this family must deal with each other and with the decades of baggage each brings as 13 people meet face-to-face in the pressure cooker of a single house on the broiling American Plains.